Investigative Reporting

Courses

J198 Investigative Reporting for the Daily Californian

This class is a lab for Daily Cal reporters to develop and deepen investigative and enterprise stories. It teaches reporters how to find sources, obtain public records, and craft compelling enterprise stories.

J260 Investigative Reporting Seminar

This class is both an introduction to the theory and practice of investigative reporting, as well as an opportunity for students to gain practical experience working collaboratively on a major in-depth reporting project. The seminar is both a place for students to be exposed to potential sources and practitioners of the craft as well as a venue to discuss and debate what we mean by "investigative reporting."

Students should submit a statement [500 words] explaining why they want to learn investigative reporting and how this will relate to their masters or their area of interest.If your goal is to improve your masters project, please identify your advisor and in one or two sentences describe the focus of the project. Preference will be given to second year students.

Proficiency in a foreign language preferably Spanish, Chinese or Russian is a consideration.

All applicants should indicate in their statement their concentration in narrative writing, radio, multi media or documentary/long form television and should self evaluate their ability to conduct interviews, work with public records and handle complex narratives. If you think you have done a story relevant to why you want to be in this class, please attach it to your response.

Recommendations from other instructors or working journalists will be considered.

 

To learn more about the Investigative Reporting Program, please visit its website.

 

Instructors

Abbie VanSickle

LecturerReporter/Lecturer

Andres Cediel

Permanent FacultyFaculty - Visual Journalism

Dave Gilson

Lecturersenior editor

Senior editor at Mother Jones, J-School alum, J200 instructor
(view profile)

John Temple

Permanent FacultyAssociate Adjunct Professor

John Temple is an associate adjunct professor and director of the Investigative Reporting Program at the Graduate School of Journalism. He oversees the editorial projects at the IRP, as well as its business and educational operations.
(view profile)

Lowell Bergman

Permanent FacultyReva and David Logan Distinguished Chair in Investigative Journalism

Richard Koci Hernandez

Permanent FacultyAssociate Professor

Richard Koci Hernandez is an internationally recognized, award-winning innovator in journalism and multimedia. He is a national Emmy award winning multimedia producer who worked as a visual journalist at the San Jose Mercury News for 15 years.
(view profile)

Timothy McGirk

Lecturer

Thomas Peele

LecturerLecturer

Thomas Peele is a Pulitzer-winning investigative reporter and author. His 2012 book Killing the Messenger (Random House) chronicled the Black Muslim Movement and the 2007 assassination of Oakland, CA, journalist Chauncey Bailey.
(view profile)

Zachary Stauffer

LecturerProducer, Investigative Reporting Program

 

To learn more about the staff of the Investigative Reporting Program, please visit its staff page.

Description

In the last decade, dozens of stories have been produced out of the Investigative Reporting Program on subjects including the practices of the credit card industry, the sexual harassment and rape of female farmworkers and janitorial workers in the U.S., and a post 9/11 terror prosecution in California. The most successful and most honored of our projects was the 2003 investigation of worker safety in the iron foundry industry. “A Dangerous Business” which appeared as both a print series and a documentary--the only winner of the Pulitzer Prize to also be acknowledged with every major award in broadcasting.

Projects produced by the program have appeared on such national television programs as PBS' Frontline, Frontline/WORLD and the NewsHour as well as ABC's Nightline, CBS’ Evening News and 60 Minutes II. In print, stories for which students were the primary authors or contributors have appeared in the pages of The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and San Francisco Chronicle as well as a wide variety of magazines and international and local newspapers.

Projects in which the students' roles were acknowledged and credited have received the Pulitzer Prize, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University award, Gerald Loeb Award, Peabody Award, National Press Club Award, George Polk award, the Sidney Hillman Award, Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) award, the Bart Richards Award for Media Criticism, and the Columbia Online Journalism Award.

Classes

The IRP’s classes emphasize the history and role of investigative reporting as well as the skills and techniques needed to do it. Instruction focuses on developing sources, conducting research and interviews, using public records, the legal issues surrounding confidentiality and other issues.

Fellowships

In 2007, in response to cutbacks at major news organizations, the IRP established the country’s first postgraduate fellowships in investigative reporting. This yearlong program is without peer at any academic institution. It is designed to enable select journalists with a proven ability to tell complex stories in the public interest to pursue stories for up to one-year, providing them with salary, benefits and editorial guidance.

Symposium and Professional Workshops

Since 2007, the IRP has hosted a “by invitation only” symposium each spring in honor of the Reva and David Logan Foundation, which endowed the program. The only symposium of its kind in the country, it routinely brings together a veritable “who’s who” of top journalists, law enforcement and government officials to address the critical issues confronting this specialized field. Starting in 2017, the IRP began offering biannual workshops to elevate the journalistic standards of independent filmmakers, increase the impact of their stories and help them break new ground.

Building

The Investigative Reporting Program has its own endowed building across the street from the Graduate School of Journalism at 2481 Hearst Ave.

To learn more about the Investigative Reporting Program, please visit its website.

J-SCHOOL ADMISSIONS

Application Deadline

December 1st at 8:59 pm PST
Application available now.

FOR UNDERGRADUATES

Summer Minor Program

FOR MID-CAREER JOURNALISTS

Workshops & Custom Training Programs