Earn your Master's Degree in Journalism. Apply today!

Video Journalism

Description

At a time when broadcast news is undergoing rapid change, and new forms of visual journalism are emerging across digital platforms, we seek to challenge and train a new generation of journalists to find innovative, creative and journalistically responsible ways of reporting and producing news using video and sound.

The introductory visual journalism class (J282) is required of all students. It covers basic videography and editing using Adobe Premiere, and reporting and producing the short video news piece. Editorially, our focus is on reporting the visual story, story development,and writing. J283, in the spring semester is a continuation of J282, but with a pronounced deadline-based production focus. We produce various forms of video news both in broadcast and digital style. More complex technologies are introduced. The emphasis is on developing the producer/director’s craft through practice and repetition. The work load is heavy. Students produce segments every two or three weeks. the last 5 weeks of the semester is devoted to producing longer, more complex stories.

Students report, write, shoot, structure, and produce hard news and news feature stories, half-hour news programs and TV news magazine programs. Students have won numerous student Emmys for their work, and many of their stories have aired on state and national PBS stations, commercial stations and national news Web sites. Students also keep a Vimeo group account, view their recent work here and see an archive of student work.

 

Description

At a time when broadcast news is undergoing rapid change, and new forms of visual journalism are emerging across digital platforms, we seek to challenge and train a new generation of journalists to find innovative, creative and journalistically responsible ways of reporting and producing news using video and sound.

The introductory visual journalism class (J282) is required of all students. It covers basic videography and editing using Adobe Premiere, and reporting and producing the short video news piece. Editorially, our focus is on reporting the visual story, story development,and writing. J283, in the spring semester is a continuation of J282, but with a pronounced deadline-based production focus. We produce various forms of video news both in broadcast and digital style. More complex technologies are introduced. The emphasis is on developing the producer/director’s craft through practice and repetition. The work load is heavy. Students produce segments every two or three weeks. the last 5 weeks of the semester is devoted to producing longer, more complex stories.

Students report, write, shoot, structure, and produce hard news and news feature stories, half-hour news programs and TV news magazine programs. Students have won numerous student Emmys for their work, and many of their stories have aired on state and national PBS stations, commercial stations and national news Web sites. Students also keep a Vimeo group account, view their recent work here and see an archive of student work.

All production is done digital using Panasonic HPX-3100, HPX-500 P2 tapeless HD cameras, compact Sony NX70s and Canon 5D MarkIII and Canon 7D DSLRs. Audio production is recorded using Schoeps, Sanken and Sennheiser microphones as well as wireless and wired Sony and Lectronics equipment. We use digital audio recorders such as the Tascam and Zoom h4N when doing dual-audio recording, and Sound Devices 302 and Shure mixers for multi-channel input. Lighting for production utilizes HMI, tungsten, and LED lighting equipment. We have dedicated one or our 2nd year edit rooms to be a finishing room for color correction with AVID Symphony and DaVinci's Resolve software. We offer a Storage Area Network (SAN) for student project backup.

Courses

  J219 – Reporting On the Digital Revolution in Plain English

This is a 5 week course: 2/5, 2/12, 2/19, 2/26 and 3/5

Reporting On the Digital Revolution in Plain English (Course Description)

Every beat now has stories that touch on technological change. This course will help journalists cut through the marketing jargon and uncover the real stories about how technology is having an impact our society. We’ll look at the the core themes that run through all technology coverage -- AI, big data robotics, social media, privacy, etc. and we’ll talk about the cultures and values of the major companies that are currently driving the change. We’ll read samples of journalism that has done an exceptional job in explaining the human and societal impacts of technology. Most importantly, through a series of short exercises and a final feature this course will help everyone find interesting ways to write about technology and engage the public in the important issues it raises. No matter what you plan to cover -- business, economics, arts, politics, poverty, science, international relations -- this course will help you find and report on the ways that technology is having an impact. Students can expect regular, but light reading assignments, and be prepared to do a deep dive into one story.

Course Objectives: Developing an approach to writing clearly and eloquently about technology. Building a list of sources. Gaining a better overall understanding of the major themes and issues of the technology revolution. Learning how to create strong narratives in technology stories.

Students will be encouraged and assisted in pitching their stories to outlets such as NPR, Wired, & The New York Times, KQED and NPR

Requirements:
One feature -- audio or print
Short turnaround reporting exercises Assigned readings

Laura Sydell is currently the Digital Culture Correspondent for NPR. Her beat focuses on the impact of technology on society and culture. She writes for NPR.org and her work has is heard regularly on NPR’s major news magazines “Morning Edition” and “All Things Considered.” Previously, she was the Senior Technology Reporter for PRI’s

“Marketplace” and a culture reporter at WNYC in New York City. Ms. Sydell has contributed to “This American Life” and “Planet Money.” Her work has been honored by Investigative Reporters and Editors, The National Headliner Awards, The Gerald Loeb Awards, and many others. Her reporting on patent trolls appeared in the Best Business Writing of 2011 published by Columbia University.

Week 1
Introductions.
Discussion of the big themes in tech coverage: e.g.,Privacy. Social Media, Robotics, Big Data, media, entertainment
Homework: Find a topic for a final feature in which one of these big themes is central. Read selected sections of “Technopoloy” by Neil Postman and “In the Plex” by Steven Levy
Listen: The Father Of The Internet Sees His Invention Reflected Back Through A 'Black Mirror'

Week 2
A Look at the big five and some history on Silicon Valley
Facebook, Apple, Alphabet/Google, Microsoft, Amazon
We’ll discuss the structure of the companies currently dominating the tech industry. We’ll look at their unique cultures and values, where they are putting their R&D dollars, where they compete, and how to approach them when you are looking for an answer to a question.
Discuss feature ideas and finalize

Assignment: Read selections from “Automating Inequality” by Virginia Eubanks and “It’s Complicated” by Danah Boyd. Bring in stories about technology that you got you really engaged.

Week 3
Diversity: How to get outside the bubble and find diverse voices and stories about tech’s impact on average people.
Strategies for interviewing tech experts.

Students will have opportunities to practice asking questions of tech expert who will make a visit to the class.
Assignment: continuing working on feature. Turn in a short story based on the interview with our guest. Read selected articles.

Week 4
Reporting on big Data & AI and hacking: We’ll discuss algorithm bias, privacy, social media and the coming war over data ownership.

Week 5
Reporting on the future: How to see where the puck is going and write about events that haven’t happened yet.

Tech journalists often find themselves in the position of looking at the potential future impact of technology. It can be a challenge to write about what you haven’t seen yet.

 

  J219 – Sports Reporting

This is a 5 week course: 2/25, 3/4, 3/11, 3/18 and 4/1

Telling True Stories via Sports

Course description: A five week mini-course focusing on craft, access, voice, interviewing, and storytelling skills, all grounded in real-world experience. The sports world will be our nominal laboratory, as it harbors diverse personalities, features natural narrative frameworks, and intersects with topics from business to education to race. That said, students need not have a background in sports, or even a pre-existing interest, and are free to cover other topics if they choose. Sports is considered here as a megaphone and lens through which to focus on the human experience. The course will include: Reading and discussion, guest speakers, drawing out reticent interview subjects, and narrative strategies. Students will work on their skills through short-form exercises, including a personal essay. The format – written, audio, video - is up to the student.

  J219 Associate Producer

This is a four week course: January 23, January 30th, February 7th and February 14th
The Associate Producer is a crucial job in any documentary and long-form video production. The AP is called upon to fulfill a wide range of duties: reporting, logistical planning, budget management, archival acquisition, organizing deliverables, and managing personalities—and each one has to be executed with precision for the project to be successful. Each week, students will screen clips and discuss all the variables filmmakers had to consider in order to help bring the scenes or projects to fruition. Students will be given assignments based on that week’s lecture and discussion: plan an international shoot for your crew, organize a schedule, figure out insurance challenges, budget the project, report on aspects of the story, and others.

  J219 Picture and Sound-8/28 – 11/6

J219 Picture & Sound is a required course for all second year shortform TV and documentary students. Classes are a combination of lecture and in-class workshop style exercises, and grades are based on attendance and quizzes. There are no outside assignments, but in class exercised will be expected to be uploaded to an online/review system called Frame.io. Multimedia students who intend to use higher end equipment from the J-School cage can take this class.

  J282 Intro to Visual Journalism – Section 1 * click here for complete room assignments

Monday: UNR; Thursday: 101 - production lab
This course explores narratives as they are designed, produced and consumed in video formats. Building on the basic skills, students develop proficiency in multimedia equipment and digital editing programs so they can create high-quality, video stories.

  J282 Intro to Visual Journalism – Section 2 * click here for complete room assignments

M LNR; Th library
This course explores narratives as they are designed, produced and consumed in video formats. Building on basic skills, students develop proficiency in multimedia equipment and digital editing programs so they can create high-quality, video stories.

  J283 Video Reporting and Storytelling – Section 1

J283 serves as Advanced Video Reporting and Storytelling across platforms. Students gain proficiency in reporting, writing, producing and digital shooting and editing. It is a production laboratory course where students report and produce breaking news and news feature stories. In the second half of the semester, students produce longer form video stories, several of which have appeared on major television programs or video websites. Original content and storytelling approaches are encouraged throughout.

  J283 Video Reporting and Storytelling-Section 2

Monday: Lower News Room

Thursday: Upper News Room

  J285 Longform Video Reporting and Storytelling

The course is a two-semester, second-year production seminar in which students develop, produce and direct work that comprises their Master’s Projects in TV reporting or video storytelling. The primary emphasis is on production of rigorously reported stories of high editorial and technical quality, intended for multi-platform distribution. Students hone their visual storytelling skills by crafting and critiquing pitches, scripts and rough cuts and workshopping production and story problems.

  J285 Longform Video Reporting and Storytelling

The course is a two-semester, second-year production seminar in which students develop, produce and direct work that comprises their Master’s Projects in TV reporting or video storytelling. The primary emphasis is on production of rigorously reported stories of high editorial and technical quality, intended for multi-platform distribution. Students hone their visual storytelling skills by crafting and critiquing pitches, scripts and rough cuts and workshopping production and story problems.

  J298 Story Structures

In this class, we’ll learn about story architecture – how to craft your material to give it tone, meaning and style, and how to choose a structure that best matches your materials, reporting constraints and artistic intentions. In our 15 weeks together, we'll examine 13 commonly-used structures to understand how they are constructed and what effects they can achieve. Once we’ve got those down, we'll use our final two classes to look at some experimenters who are blowing up the rules. We’ll be studying work in all media – documentaries, podcasts, magazines and newspaper articles, multimedia presentations, even a bit of VR. Students from any year and any media track are welcome! This is a discussion seminar and workshop — each student will workshop two of their own reported pieces with the class. (These can be pieces you are reporting for other spring classes, for your masters thesis, or for freelance assignments. You are highly encouraged to “double dip” your assignments for Story Structures with work in another course!)

  J298: Freedom of Information

Freedom of Information

This class will survey the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, state public records laws, access to state and federal court records (with emphasis on understanding and opposing the sealing for court records) and emphasize the making of requests and obtaining access. We’ll also study major court decisions granting and limiting access, learn access tricks to records for which instant access is the norm, as well as explore the basic Constitutional access to court records.

Students will learn how to hunt down government information and how vet whether archived, third party information, is accurate and trustworthy. They will develop a document state of mind.

Classes will be split between lectures and work on a group project. No outside work will be assigned other than readings and occasional access maters that must be done during business hours. No papers will be required.

Students wishing to take a five week mini version of the class will receive full class lectures for the first five weeks of the semester with no group project.

Proposed class project: Use all available information to crack and dissect secret Delaware controlled by Donald J. Trump.   This will include examining, say, local and state records involving a Trump building project. Those records will include land use records, construction permits, liquor licenses, tax abatements, tax records, court records, OSHA records, and many, many more.

Instructors

Andrés Cediel

Permanent Faculty

Samantha Grant

Lecturer

Richard Koci Hernandez

Permanent Faculty

Betsy Rate

Lecturer

Mike Shen

Lecturer

Zachary Stauffer

Lecturer

VIDEO JOURNALISM

Student Work

Original video produced by first year students at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

J-SCHOOL ADMISSIONS

Apply Today

December 2nd at
8:59 pm PST
Application available September.

FOR UNDERGRADUATES

Summer Minor Program

FOR MID-CAREER JOURNALISTS

Workshops & Custom Training Programs