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Course Curriculum

International Reporting Faculty

Faculty

Neil Henry (Professor and Dean Emeritus)

Neil Henry worked for 16 years as a staff writer for The Washington Post and Newsweek magazine prior to joining the faculty in 1993. A former national correspondent and Africa Bureau Chief for the Washington Post, Professor Henry has won awards from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Associated Press, and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial for his reporting and writing. He is the author of a 2002 racial memoir, Pearl's Secret. His second book, American Carnival, which examines the news industry's adjustments to the digital age, was published in 2007. Between 2007 and 2011, Professor Henry served as dean of the Graduate School of Journalism, attracting three endowed chairs under the Hewlett Challenge and hastening the School's curricular transition to incorporate digital skills training. A graduate in Politics from Princeton University, Professor Henry earned his Master's degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Bob Calo (Senior Lecturer)

Bob Calo began his career in television at KQED in San Francisco, where he produced daily news and documentaries for the local and national PBS audience. He moved to New York to join ABC News “Primetime Live,” and then to NBC News as a broadcast producer. Calo produced stories throughout the U.S. and foreign countries, including assignments in Pakistan, Chile, Croatia, Kenya, and Somalia. His work has been honored by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, IRE, and National Headliner awards, among others. He is the Senior Producer of the PBS Series, “Sound Tracks.” Calo joined the faculty in 2001 and continues to write and produce for the national broadcast audience.

Lydia Chavez (Professor and Robert A. Peck Chair in Journalism)

Lydia Chávez started as a reporter for The Albuquerque Tribune, later moving on to Time magazine, the Los Angeles Times and The New York Times, where she served as El Salvador and South American bureau chief. In 2005, Chávez and her students collaborated to publish “Capitalism, God and A Good Cigar: Cuba Enters the Twenty-First Century” (Duke University Press). And in 1998, Chávez published, “The Color Bind: California’s Battle Against Affirmative Action,” which won the Leonard Silk Award (UC Press). She has also written op-ed pieces for The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Examiner and magazine pieces for the New York Times and Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazines and George Magazine. She holds a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from the University of California at Berkeley and a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism.

Mark Danner (Professor)

Mark Danner is a writer and reporter who for three decades has written on politics and foreign affairs, focusing on war and conflict. He has covered, among many other stories, wars and political conflict in Central America, Haiti, the Balkans, Iraq and the Middle East, and, most recently, the story of torture during the War on Terror. Danner is Professor of Journalism and English at the University of California, Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard College. Among his books are Torture and the Forever War (forthcoming, 2014), Stripping Bare the Body (2009), The Secret Way to War: The Downing Street Memo and the Iraq War's Buried History (2006), Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib, and the War on Terror (2004), The Road to Illegitimacy: One Reporter's Travels through the 2000 Florida Vote Recount (2004), and The Massacre at El Mozote: A Parable of the Cold War (1994). Danner was a longtime staff writer at The New Yorker and is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His work has appeared in Harper's, The New York Times, Aperture, and many other newspapers and magazines. He co-wrote and helped produce two hour-long documentaries for the ABC News program Peter Jennings Reporting , and his work has received, among other honors, a National Magazine Award, three Overseas Press Awards, and an Emmy. In 1999 Danner was named a MacArthur Fellow. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Century Association, the World Affairs Council and serves as a resident curator at the Telluride Film Festival. He speaks and lectures widely on foreign policy and America's role in the world.

Previous Lecturers

Kalpana Sharma

Kalpana Sharma is a journalist, columnist and author. In over four decades as a journalist in India, she has worked in senior editorial positions with The Hindu, Times of India, Indian Express and Himma Weekly. Currently, she is a columnist with The Hindu and contributing editor at Economic and Political Weekly. Her areas of focus are environmental and developmental issues, urbanisation, gender and the media. She is the author of "Rediscovering Dharavi: Stories from Asia's Largest Slum" and has recently edited, "Missing: Half the Story, Journalism as if Gender Matters."