People

Lecturers & Fellows

Our current visiting lectures are distinguished journalists from around the world teaching their craft and expertise to our students each semester. Faculty student ratio is small, allowing for ample faculty student contact through the two year program.

Peter Aldhous

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Peter Aldhous is a freelance science journalist. He also teaches investigative reporting in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and has developed online training materials in data visualization for the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Peter got his start in journalism in 1989 as a reporter for Nature in London, fresh from a PhD in animal behavior. Later he worked as European correspondent for Science, news editor for New Scientist and chief news and features editor with Nature, before moving in California in 2005 to become New Scientist’s San Francisco bureau chief. Peter works with free tools to “interview” and visualize data – from scans of his own DNA to records of human conflict. His projects include web apps that have explored the local and global history of climate change, and the number of Earth-like planets in our galaxy. Peter’s articles have won awards from bodies including the Association of British Science Writers, the Society of Environmental Journalists, and the Wistar Institute. 

Thomas Burke

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Andres Cediel

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Marilyn Chase

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Marilyn Chase is a graduate of Stanford University with a BA in English, and the University of California at Berkeley with a Master's in Journalism. As a reporter at The Wall Street Journal, Chase covered a variety of medical beats including the biotechnology industry, disease research and personal health. She is the author of "The Barbary Plague: the Black Death in Victorian San Francisco," (Random House, 2003).

Edwin Dobb

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More stubborn than smart, Edwin Dobb was in his mid-30s, his teenage children weary of wearing Goodwill clothes, before he conceded that writing plays and working in the theater would never pay the rent. Luckily, opportunity knocked, improvisational malarkey prevailed, and he found himself editing (code word for ghostwriting) at a greatly admired award-winning magazine in New York called The Sciences. Against all expectation, Dobb eventually became editor-in-chief. He also became discontent and, on the verge of financial security for the first time in his life, left to write full-time. That was 1990. Since then, Dobb has sold sentences to all manner of publications, from Reader's Digest and Vogue to Discover, Audubon, and The New York Times Magazine. In time, to his great relief, the hackwork decreased and he secured assignments with more heft and consequence. From 1998 to 2007, Dobb was a contributing writer at Harper’s. For the past several years he's been working for National Geographic. Dobb is the co-writer and co-producer of a documentary film, called “Butte, America,” that aired on Independent Lens in the fall of 2009. A lecturer since 2000, and a longstanding investigative anthropologist, he teaches reported narrative writing, literary nonfiction, and environmental journalism.

Deirdre English

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Deirdre English has written and edited work on a wide array of subjects related to investigative reporting, cultural politics, gender studies, and public policy. She has contributed articles, commentaries and reviews to Mother Jones magazine, the Nation, and The New York Times Book Review, among other publications, and to public radio and television. She is the former Editor-in-Chief of Mother Jones magazine where she worked for eight years, ending in 1986. She has taught American Studies and magazine writing and production at the College of Old Westbury at the State University of New York and has been a lecturer at City College of New York and the University of California at Santa Cruz. Her most current work includes a revision of For Her Own Good: Two Centuries of the Experts’ Advice to Women (Anchor), co-authored with Barbara Ehrenreich and published with a new Afterword in 2004, and an essay on the work of photographer Susan Meiselas, published in Carnival Strippers, Whitney Museum of American Art, 2003. She has taught at the J-school since 1988, and directed the Felker Magazine course for several years, during which the her class has won numerous regional and national Mark of Excellence awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, including the national Best Student Magazine and Best Feature Article of 2009.

James Fahn

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Samantha Grant

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Samantha Grant is a documentary filmmaker, journalist, and educator. Through her production company GUSHproductions Samantha has worked with FRONTLINE, ABC, MTV, CNN, NPR, PRI, FRONTLINE/World, PBS, Al Jazeera International, and Current TV, as well as several national corporate clients like Pandora, Merrill Lynch, AT&T and Electronic Arts. A third generation journalist, Sam considers it a joy and a privilege to bring to life stories that are compelling, character-driven narratives rooted solidly in journalism. Her approach to storytelling is informed by both her undergraduate degree in American Studies/Literature from Yale University and her Master’s of Journalism degree from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Sam was a 2007 Carnegie/Knight Fellow, and is an alumna of the WGBH CPB/PBS Producers Academy. Sam was also selected as a BAVC MediaMaker Fellow in 2011. Currently, Sam is directing the ITVS Open Call funded feature documentary A FRAGILE TRUST: Plagiarism, Power, and Jayson Blair at the New York Times , about the 2003 Jayson Blair Journalism scandal. In addition, Sam received funding to build DECISIONS ON DEADLINE an Alternate Reality Educational News Game that teaches journalism ethics as a companion project to A FRAGILE TRUST. Also, Sam is Producing/Shooting the independent feature documentary GIRLS IN THE FOREST about a revolutionary all-girls agricultural boarding school in the last old-growth forest in Paraguay. When she's not shooting, producing or directing documentaries, you can find Sam lecturing at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, lecturing at Stanford's Knight Fellowship program, or hanging out with her husband and their two beautiful daughters.

Cassandra Herrman

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Cassandra Herrman is a documentary filmmaker based in Berkeley, California. She recently co-directed and photographed “Tulia, Texas”, the story of a small town struggling with the aftermath of a controversial drug sting. “Tulia, Texas” broadcast on the PBS series INDEPENDENT LENS in 2009. For PBS’ FRONTLINE/World, she has produced and filmed numerous documentaries, including stories about human rights in Zimbabwe; female runners in Kenya; and the humanitarian crisis in Darfur, nominated for a 2006 National Emmy Award. Cassandra received her master’s degree from U.C. Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism in 2001.

Adam Hochschild

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Adam Hochschild is the author of seven books. 'Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire's Slaves' won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the PEN USA Literary Award, the Gold Medal of the California Book Awards, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. He has twice been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His 'Finding the Trapdoor: Essays, Portraits, Travels,' collects some of the articles he has done in several decades of writing for various newspapers and magazines. Earlier in his career, he was a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, a commentator on National Public Radio's "All Things Considered," and an editor and writer at Mother Jones magazine. His articles have also been published in the New Yorker, Harper's, the Atlantic, the New York Times Magazine, and elsewhere. In 2009 he received the Theodore Roosevelt-Woodrow Wilson Award from the American Historical Association and in 2014 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Matthew Isaacs

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Jason Jaacks

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forthcoming

Jennifer Kahn

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Jennifer Kahn is feature writer for The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, Outside, and Wired magazine, among others. A graduate of Princeton University and UC Berkeley, she has degrees in astrophysics and journalism, and has been a recipient of the CASE-UCLA media fellowship in neuroscience. Her work has been chosen for the Best American Science Writing series four times. She is also featured in Best American Sports Writing 2010.

Dan Krauss

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Forthcoming.

Ben Manilla

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Ben Manilla is one of America's foremost audio producers. His 30-year career spans all aspects of creative sound production. He has invented series for National Public Radio, The Disney Company, The Library of Congress, CBS, PBS, and many others. He created a full-time satellite channel for Starbucks, invented a new music format for public radio in Milwaukee, and for 20 years has collaborated with Dan Aykroyd on the House of Blues radio series. Together, they wrote the book, "Elwood's Blues". Ben's work has been honored with the Peabody Award, the Major Armstrong Award, The Edward R. Murrow Award, The Music Journalism Award, The Ohio State Public Service Broadcasting Award, Billboard Magazine's Syndicated Radio Show Award, and many more. Ben has a degree in Drama from New York University.

Victoria Mauleon

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Timothy McGirk

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A veteran investigative reporter, magazine writer and former Time magazine bureau chief, Tim McGirk has covered the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Israeli- Palestinian conflict and the hunt for al-Qaeda.

Alan Mutter

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Alan D. Mutter began his career as a newspaper columnist and editor at the Chicago Daily News and later rose to City Editor of the Chicago Sun-Times. In 1984, he became the No. 2 editor of the San Francisco Chronicle. He left the newspaper business in 1988 to join InterMedia Partners, a start-up company that became one of the largest cable-TV companies in the country. Mutter was the COO of InterMedia when he moved to Silicon Valley in 1996 to lead the first of the three start-up companies he led as CEO. The companies he headed were a pioneering Internet service provider and two enterprise-software companies delivering cutting-edge solutions for media companies. Mutter now is a consultant specializing in corporate initiatives and new media ventures that combine his twin passions, journalism and technology. He joined the adjunct faculty of the Journalism School in January, 2009.

Spencer Nakasako

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Tom Peele

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Thomas Peele is an investigative reporter for the Bay Area News Group and the Chauncey Bailey Project. He is a 25-year veteran of newspapers on both coasts.  His many honors include Investigative and Editors Tom Renner Award and Columbia University’s Paul Tobekin Memorial Award. He was a 2009 finalist for the Medill Medal for Courage in Journalism.  Peele specializes in public records and public accountability reporting. He routinely writes enterprise stories about government malfeasance and corruption. He also writes a monthly column, The Watchdog, on government transparency and freedom of the press. Before joining the Contra Costa Times in 2000, Peele was a staff writer for the Atlantic City Press in New Jersey where he covered government corruption and organized crime. He has also has worked for newspapers in New Jersey, New York and begin his career at Newsday as a prep sportswriter while a college student.

Peele holds an MFA in Writing from the University of San Francisco. His first book, Killing the Messenger, is scheduled to be published by Random House in 2011.

Kara Platoni

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Kara Platoni was a staff writer for the East Bay Express for eight years, then spent two years as the Senior Editor at Terrain, a Berkeley-based environmental quarterly. She is a freelance science writer whose work has appeared in Smithsonian, Popular Science, Air & Space, and other magazines, and she co-hosts The Field Trip Podcast. She teaches the class that is producing the hyperlocal news sites OaklandNorth.net and RichmondConfidential.org, as well as the undergraduate J100 class. More information and favorite stories at KaraPlatoni.com.

Robert Rogers

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Jeremy Rue

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Jeremy Rue is a Lecturer of digital storytelling at the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Before formally joining the ranks of the grad school, he was formerly a multimedia instructor for the Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley where he taught workshops to hundreds of professional journalists on new media storytelling techniques. He has spoken at conferences for the Associated Press Managing Editors, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Association of Black Journalists, American Association of Sunday Feature Editors and the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. He has led several newsroom trainings on the transition to digital journalism, including National Public Radio, American Public Media and the University of California Office of the President. He was a technical editor for several textbooks on Adobe Flash, and Adobe Dreamweaver. Rue worked as a multimedia journalist for the Oakland Tribune; as a multimedia producer and photographer for a Carnegie-Knight funded reporting fellowship; as a photojournalist for The Fresno Bee, The Modesto Bee and the Duluth News-Tribune in Minnesota; and as a reporter for the Selma (Calif.) Enterprise, where he covered city government, courts and crime. Rue is the recipient of the 2007 Dorothea Lange Fellowship for his photo documentary work on migrant farm workers in the California Central Valley. He is an experienced web developer with knowledge in HTML/CSS, JavaScript, Unix/Linux, PHP/MySQL and a variety of other scripting languages. He has a Master of Journalism degree from UC Berkeley.

Linda Schacht

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Linda Schacht is an Emmy award winning television reporter with more than 20 years experience in local television. Her career began at KQED-TV on the highly regarded Newsroom nightly news show. She then covered politics, locally and nationally, for KPIX, the CBS owned and operated station in San Francisco, for nineteen years. Linda has won two Emmy awards and an American Bar Association national award for her political coverage. She has been on the faculty since 1992 and continues to write television scripts and do special television and documentary projects.

Mark Schapiro

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Mike Shen

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Zachary Stauffer

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David Thigpen

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David Tuller

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David Tuller was a reporter and editor for ten years at the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as health editor at Salon.com and frequently writes health stories for the New York Times. He received his masters in public health at Berkeley in 2005.

James Wheaton

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James Wheaton is Founder and Senior Counsel at the First Amendment Project, a public interest law firm. He is also President of the Environmental Law Foundation, an environmental enforcement program. He is a former City of Oakland Public Ethics Commissioner, Executive Director of California Common Cause, and co-chair of the Society of Professional Journalists (NorCal) Freedom of Information Committee. He is a graduate of Brown University and UC's Boalt Hall. He received the Playboy Foundation First Amendment Award for Law in 2001 for defending against SLAPP cases, and the Society of Professional Journalists’ James Madison award for Pro Bono Counsel in 1993 and 2001 for his work and leadership on behalf of Freedom of Information.

Former Lecturers & Fellows

Garance Burke

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Shan Carter

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Cyrus Farivar

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Cyrus Farivar [suh-ROOS FAR-ih-var] is a journalist, radio producer and author. He is also the senior business editor at Ars Technica, a tech news website owned by Condé Nast. His book, The Internet of Elsewhere—about the history and effects of the Internet on different countries around the world, including Senegal, Iran, Estonia and South Korea—was published by Rutgers University Press in April 2011. He has reported for Deutsche Welle English, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, National Public Radio, Public Radio International, The Economist, Wired, The New York Times and many others. He has a B.A. in Political Economy from the University of California, Berkeley and a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He's also survived three VfDs on Wikipedia. However, on a 4th VfD attempt in February 2007, he was, in fact, deleted. For the moment, Cyrus is still waiting for someone to add him back.

Susan J. Ferriss

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Andrew Gilbert

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Andrew Gilbert has covered music, modern dance and film for numerous publications since 1989. He is a regular contributor to the Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, San Jose Mercury News, San Diego Union-Tribune and Contra Costa Times. His CD reviews air monthly on KQED’s “California Report.” Born and raised in Los Angeles, he earned a B.A. in politics from U.C. Santa Cruz. His master’s thesis for U.C. Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, a half-hour documentary on jazz/cabaret singer Wesla Whitfield, won a Golden Spire award at the 1999 San Francisco International Film Festival.

Helene Goupil

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Helene Goupil is a multimedia journalist and co-author of "San Francisco: The Unknown City." Her stories have been published in the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the International Herald Tribune and the Los Angeles Times among other publications. She's a founding editor at Missionlocal.org and teaches J200.

Robert Gunnison

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Rob Gunnison was previously the Director of School Affairs at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley. He arrived in 1999 after writing for 15 years for the San Francisco Chronicle in Sacramento, where he covered state government and politics with an emphasis on budget and tax issues. Before that, he was Sacramento Bureau Manager for United Press International where he covered government and politics for  11 years. His reporting on the savings and loan debacle was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.  Mr. Gunnison currently teaches a summer course "Reporting and Writing the News”. 

Tyche Hendricks

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Tyche Hendricks is an editor for The California Report at KQED Public Radio. For many years she covered immigration, demographic trends and immigrant communities as a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle. Hendricks has worked extensively on the U.S.-Mexico border and her reporting has taken her across the continent from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Lake Nicaragua. Along the way, she has trekked through deserts and jungles, helped pregnancy test cattle and bury hurricane victims, monitored polling stations and learned to cook pollo en mole. Her book, "The Wind Doesn't Need a Passport: Stories from the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands," was published by the University of California Press in June 2010. Hendricks has worked at the Hearst-owned San Francisco Examiner, the San Jose Mercury News, the Seattle Times and as a freelance radio producer. Her work has won awards, including a Best of the West prize and an NFCB Golden Reel. She holds a BA from Wesleyan University, and an MA in Latin American Studies and an MJ in Journalism, both from UC Berkeley.

Nathanael Johnson

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Jigar Mehta

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Forthcoming.

T. Christian Miller

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Megan Mylan

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Megan Mylan is a New York-based documentary filmmaker whose work has been recognized with an Academy Award, Emmy-nomination, Independent Spirit Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is currently directing a documentary on race relations in Brazil. She directed and produced the Oscar-winning film Smile Pinki broadcast on HBO. Her film, Lost Boys of Sudan, co-directed with Jon Shenk, was nominated for two national Emmys and won an Independent Spirit Award. The film had a 70-city theatrical release and a national television broadcast on PBS’s POV. Through an extensive social action campaign, Lost Boys raised more than a million dollars for refugee education funds, mobilized student action around the Darfur crisis and recruited thousands of volunteer mentors for refugees. Megan also directed Batidania on Brazilian resistance music. She has worked on documentaries for HBO, PBS, Showtime and the BBC including the Oscar nominated, Long Night’s Journey Into Day and the Sundance Award winning film Sing Faster. Before beginning in film, Megan worked with Ashoka, an international development non-profit, in the U.S. and Brazil. She has a Bachelor’s from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and Masters' degrees in Journalism and Latin American Studies from the University of California at Berkeley.

Carl Nasman

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Davia Nelson

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Nelson and Silva, also known as the "Kitchen Sisters", are frequent contributors to NPR.

Kevin Quealy

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Kathleen Richards

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Kathleen Richards is the co-editor of the East Bay Express, where she has worked since 2006, while still a student at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. She oversees the paper's entire arts and culture section, and her own reporting has won awards from the Association of Alternative Newsmedia, the Society of Professional Journalists, and the San Francisco Peninsula Press Club, among others. Her background is primarily in music journalism: She was the founder of a bimonthly magazine called Bay Area Buzz, which covered the local music scene. In her spare time, she plays drums in a rock band.

Claire Schoen

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Documentaries open a window onto the lives of everyday people; weaving their stories into a narrative whole. For the past thirty years Claire Schoen has been creating documentaries in radio, film, video, museum tour and theater. In radio, Claire has produced over 25 long-format works, as well as countless short pieces, telling stories of undocumented Salvadoran immigrants, Russians living in Soviet-era Moscow, Blacks and Jews working together in the Civil Rights movement to name a few. Claire's most recent series, RISE,  explores the impact of sea level rise and extreme weather on people living by the water. Produced in long-form radio, as radio features, podcasts, multimedia and as a museum exhibit, RISE reached an international audience of millions. Claire has taught radio production previously at the J-School as well as for Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies, USC's Annenberg School of Journalism and other venues. Please take a spin around Claire's site to listen to her stories: www.claireschoenmedia.com.

Kalpana Sharma

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Kalpana Sharma is a journalist, columnist and author. In over four decades as a journalist in India, she has worked in senior editorial positions with The Hindu, Times of India, Indian Express and Himma Weekly. Currently, she is a columnist with The Hindu and contributing editor at Economic and Political Weekly. Her areas of focus are environmental and developmental issues, urbanisation, gender and the media. She is the author of "Rediscovering Dharavi: Stories from Asia's Largest Slum" and has recently edited, "Missing: Half the Story, Journalism as if Gender Matters."

Nikki Silva

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Malia Wollan

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Malia Wollan is a contributing writer for the New York Times in San Francisco. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times Magazine, Fast Company, Harper's, National Public Radio, the Associated Press, The Telegraph, KQED's science radio program Quest and PBS's Frontline/World. She is a lecturer at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism and an editor at Meatpaper magazine.